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Light Line™ Respiratory

Light Line™ Respiratory

Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia (VAP) is a nosocomial pneumonia that develops more than 48-72 hours after endotracheal intubation [1]. It is the most common infection acquired by adults and children in intensive care units (ICUs) and is a cause of significant patient morbidity and
mortality, increased utilization of healthcare resources and excess cost [2]. During mechanical ventilation, secretions from the upper respiratory tract accumulate above the endotracheal tube cuff. Studies have shown that these secretions can seep past the cuff into the lower tract [3]. 
Drainage of the subglottic secretions has been proven as an effective strategy in preventing early-onset VAP [4].

 

 

References

  1.  American Thoracic Society; Infectious Diseases Society of America. Guidelines for the management of adults with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated and healthcare-associated pneumonia. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005;171:388.
  2. Coffin S MD, MPH, Klompas M MD, Classen D MD, et al. Strategies to Prevent Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Acute Care Hospitals. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2008; 29:S31-S40.
  3. American Thoracic Society. Consensus Statement: Hospital Acquired Pneumonia in Adults: diagnosis, assessment of severity, initial antimicrobial therapy and preventative strategies. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 1996;151:1711-1725.
  4. Dezfulian C, Shojania K, Collard HR, Kim HM, Matthay MA, Saint S. Subglottic secretion drainage for preventing ventilator-associated pneumonia: a meta-analysis. Am J Med 2005; 118:11-18.